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Posted: December 12, 2008

Keeping Seniors Healthy

Bladder Control Problems Nothing to Be Embarrassed About

Q. This topic is too embarrassing for my elderly aunt to discuss with anyone, so I thought I’d write to you about it. My aunt is having bladder-control problems. What can she (or I) do?

About 10% of men and women over the age of 65 have trouble with bladder control, also known officially as urinary incontinence. Women suffer from this more than men.

During urination, muscles in the bladder contract, forcing urine into the urethra, a tube that carries urine out of the body. At the same time, muscles surrounding the urethra relax and let the urine pass. If the bladder muscles contract or the muscles surrounding the urethra relax without warning, the result is incontinence.

Short-term incontinence is caused by infections, constipation, and some medicines. If the problem persists, it might be caused by weak bladder muscles, overactive bladder muscles, blockage from an enlarged prostate, damage to nerves that control the bladder from diseases such as multiple sclerosis or Parkinson’s disease.

In most cases, urinary incontinence can be treated and controlled, if not cured. If your aunt is having bladder control problems, take her to her doctor. Doctors see this problem all the time, so there is no need for her to be embarrassed.

The doctor may do a number of tests on your urine, blood and bladder. You or your aunt may be asked to keep a daily chart about her urination.

There are several different types of urinary incontinence. If urine leaks when you sneeze, cough, laugh or put pressure on the bladder in other ways, you have “stress incontinence.” When you can’t hold urine, you have “urge incontinence.” When small amounts of urine leak from a bladder that is always full, you have “overflow incontinence.” Many older people who have normal bladder control, but have difficulty getting to the bathroom in time, have “functional incontinence.”

There are many ways to treat urinary incontinence. The method depends upon the type of problem.

You can train your bladder with exercises and biofeedback. You can also chart your urination and then empty your bladder before you might leak.

Your doctor has other tools he can use. There are urethral plugs and vaginal inserts for women with stress incontinence. There are medicines that relax muscles, helping the bladder to empty more fully during urination. Others tighten muscles in the bladder and urethra to cut down leakage.

Surgery can improve or cure incontinence if it is caused by a problem such as a change in the position of the bladder or blockage due to an enlarged prostate. Common surgery for stress incontinence involves pulling the bladder up and securing it. When stress incontinence is serious, the surgeon may use a wide sling. This holds up the bladder and narrows the urethra to prevent leakage.

Even if treatment is not fully successful, management of incontinence can help you feel more relaxed and comfortable about the problem.


Fred Cicetti is a freelance writer who specializes in health. He has been writing professionally since 1963. Before he began freelancing, he was a reporter and columnist for three daily newspapers in New Jersey. He has written two published novels: Saltwater Taffy, and Local Angles. You can send your health-related questions to Fred at fred@healthygeezer.com.

© 2008 Pederson Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
Commercial use, redistribution or other forms of reuse of this information is strictly prohibited without the prior written permission of Pederson Publishing.
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