Caregiver's Home Companion Free captioning phone for those with hearing loss.
 HOME PAGE  SEARCH Go

Posted: May 20, 2008

High Cholesterol in Mid-Life Increases Your Alzheimer's Risk

People with high cholesterol in their early 40s are more likely to develop Alzheimer's disease than those with low cholesterol, according to research presented at the American Academy of Neurology annual meeting in Chicago.

"Our findings show it would be best for both physicians and patients to attack high cholesterol levels in their 40s to reduce the risk of dementia," said study author Dr. Alina Solomon, with the University of Kuopio in Finland. Solomon collaborated with Rachel Whitmer, PhD, senior author of the study and a research scientist with the Kaiser Permanente Division of Research in Oakland, California.

Their study involved 9,752 men and women in northern California who underwent health evaluations between 1964 and 1973 when they were between the ages of 40 and 45 and remained with the same health plan through 1994. From 1994 to 2007, researchers obtained the participants' most recent medical records to find that 504 people had received a diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease and 162 had been diagnosed with vascular dementia.

advertisement
Discount Prescriptions
The study found that people with total cholesterol levels between 249 and 500 milligrams were one-and-a-half times more likely to develop Alzheimer's than those with cholesterol levels of less than 198 milligrams. People with total cholesterol levels of 221 to 248 milligrams were more than one-and-a-quarter times more likely to develop Alzheimer's.

"High mid-life cholesterol increased the risk of Alzheimer's disease, regardless of mid-life diabetes, high blood pressure, obesity, smoking and late-life stroke," said Solomon.

Solomon says conclusions regarding high mid-life cholesterol and the risk of vascular dementia were difficult to formulate as there are several types of vascular dementia that may have slightly different risk factors.

Email or share this story Bookmark and Share

Search CaregiversHome
Find with keyword(s):

Enter a keyword or phrase to search CaregiversHome's archives for related news topics, the latest news stories, timely times, and reference articles.

© 2008 Pederson Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
Commercial use, redistribution or other forms of reuse of this information is strictly prohibited without the prior written permission of Pederson Publishing.

_____

View The Caregiver's Hotline in which this article first appeared

Back to Top

Privacy Statement Contact Us Site Map Products & Services Our Partners Advertise
© Copyright 2003-2020. Pederson Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved.